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Tennessee Capitol Report – January 31, 2016

February 5, 2016

Senator Norris at Northeast State Community College in Blountville at the VETS Campus designation

Senator Norris at Northeast State Community College in Blountville
at the VETS Campus designation

Northeast Community College Designated a VETS Campus

Posted on February 3, 2016 by Darlene Schlicher

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville) visited the Tri-Cities area on Thursday and Friday. He was the keynote speaker at Northeast State Community College’s Blountville Campus on Friday recognizing the VETS Campus designation.

Northeast State Community College was the 11th school to receive this distinction and joins Austin Peay State University, Chattanooga State Community College, Cleveland State Community College, East Tennessee State University, Middle Tennessee State University, Pellissippi State Community College, Tennessee State University, Tennessee Technological University, University of Memphis, University of Tennessee, Volunteer State Community College and Walter State Community College.

Senator Norris was introduced by Lt. Governor Ron Ramsey (R-Blountville) and accompanied by Dr. Russ Deaton, the Interim Executive Director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC).

The 2014 VETS Act, authored and passed by Norris, provides in-state tuition to veterans upon discharge, and incentivizes “vets-friendly” campuses.

Norris chairs the Veterans Subcommittee in the Senate State and Local Government Committee.

The son of a B-24 pilot, Senator Norris has sponsored and passed many laws helping Tennessee veterans, including the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children, legislation helping deployed parents deal with custody issues, enhanced Prior Learning Assessments for academic credit to vets for service-related training, and Vets Reconnect.

Northeast Community College received $94,000 under a Veterans Reconnect grant last year. That grant funded the Veterans Affairs Endowed Scholarship and the Veterans Emergency Scholarship. It enabled the purchase of new IT equipment, furniture and televisions for both the Blountville and Johnson City Campus Vet Centers, new IT equipment for the Veterans Affairs Office and the purchase of books entitled “Life During College – The Veteran’s Guide to Success” with information on the differences between military and college culture, study habits, managing finances and maximizing benefits, and employment-seeking skills.

Governor Bill Haslam’s unveils 2016-2017 budget focusing on education

Governor Bill Haslam delivered his proposal to fund state government for the 2016-2017 fiscal year in his annual State of the State Address this week, unveiling a balanced $34.8 billion proposal that makes the largest investment in K-12 education without a tax increase in Tennessee’s history. The governor’s Fiscal Year 2016-2017 budget proposes 261 million in new dollars for Tennessee public education, including $104.6 million for teacher salaries. It also builds up state reserves, puts Tennessee on the path to catch up on long-deferred maintenance of buildings, reinvests in the state workforce and focuses one-time dollars on reducing the state’s ongoing costs.

In his speech, Gov. Haslam highlighted the collaborative effort with the General Assembly to grow Tennessee’s economy, reduce ongoing costs, provide high quality service to taxpayers and maintain fiscal discipline that has positioned Tennessee to invest in its priorities. The governor said that the budget proposal takes advantage of a strengthening economy combined with the hard work and discipline of departments of state government and the conservative fiscal strategy employed by the General Assembly, the state’s constitutional officers and his administration.

“By managing wisely and investing strategically, we’re making tax dollars work harder for Tennesseans. This is what we do,” Haslam said.

Including the current fiscal year’s appropriation, state government will invest more than 414 million in new dollars in Tennessee schools. Haslam proposed funding the 12th month of health insurance for teachers and doubling the state’s recurring contribution for technology needs at schools.

The governor’s proposal puts $100 million into the state’s Rainy Day Fund, bringing it to an estimated $668 million on June 30, 2017; $60 million for salary increases for state employees; and another $36 million for market rate adjustments for state employees making less than $50,000 annually.

Gov. Haslam proposed significant investments in higher education and the Drive to 55 initiative, the state’s effort to increase the number of Tennesseans with a postsecondary credential to 55 percent by 2025, including:

  • $50 million for the Complete College funding formula for higher education;
  • $20 million for the Drive to 55 Capacity Fund to help community and technical colleges meet the growing demand for degrees and certificates; and
  • $10 million for the Labor Education Alignment Program (LEAP), helping communities align degree and course offerings with the needs of the local workforce.

“My focus has been and remains on the ‘Four E’s of Tennessee:’ Employment, Education, Economic Opportunity and Efficiency,” commented Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), who carries the Governor’s Budget through the legislative process. “This budget reflects and furthers that focus through additional funding for the Labor Education Alignment Program (LEAP) I crafted in 2013. The Tennessee Higher Education Commissions 2016 LEAP Report, released last month, calls for more funding for expansion, and this budget answers that call.”

The proposal invests $581.6 million in state and other funds to build new buildings and fix existing higher education and general state government facilities. This includes the top recommended capital projects for both the University of Tennessee (UT) system and the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR):

  • $85.5 million for a new Tennessee Tech University laboratory science building;
  • $39 million for a new dentistry building at the UT Health Science Center in Memphis;
  • $38.8 million for Tennessee State University’s new health science building; and
  • $36 million for renovations to UT-Chattanooga academic buildings.

Other notable budget investments are:

  • $130 million from the General Fund to repay the Highway Fund;
  • $24 million in state funds for the Employment and Community First (ECF) CHOICES program to allow the state to serve more people currently on the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities’ waiting list and others eligible for services;
  • $12.8 million for facilities and homeland security upgrades for the Military Department;
  • $10 million for the Department of Economic and Community Development’s Rural Development Initiative;
  • $1.27 million to increase the number of drug recovery courts from 41 to 50 and for two additional veterans courts.

“We have been very prudent with Tennessee’s finances. We have the lowest state debt in the nation and nothing in this budget will create new debt,” added Senate Speaker Pro Tempore Bo Watson (R-Hixson), who is Vice-Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee. “Rather, this budget increases the state’s savings account which declined greatly during the recession years to ensure we have the financial safety net we need in the event of a downturn in the economy. I look forward to working with the administration as this budget moves forward.”

Legislation calling for online voter registration advances in the Senate State and Local Government Committee

Legislation providing for the establishment of an online voter registration system for Tennesseans was unanimously approved by members of the Senate State and Local Government Committee this week. Under Senate Bill 1626 / House Bill 1742, sponsored by Senate State and Local Government Committee Chairman Ken Yager (R-Kingston), voters with an unexpired driver’s license or personal identification card issued by the Department of Safety will be able to go to an official state website where they will be able to register to vote online.

“In an electronic age, it makes sense to provide electronic registration if we have proper safeguards and validation steps,” said Senator Yager. “This legislation provides those assurances to make voter registration more convenient for Tennesseans and hopefully encourages more citizens to participate in the election process.”

The voter registration application would be reviewed electronically. If the request is confirmed to be valid, the new registration would be added to the state’s voter registration list after being reviewed by the respective county election commission office. The validation step is done by comparing the information on the online registration form against the information provided by the same individual when he or she received a driver’s license or their state-issued identification card.

The signature already on record with the state would become the signature on record for voting. If the information does not match, the applicant would be directed to print and complete the application and mail it to the county election commission office in their county of residence to be processed.

Twenty-nine states plus the District of Columbia offer online registration, and another two states have passed legislation to create online voter registration systems, but have not yet implemented them.

Bills to help military service members and veterans advance in Senate Committees

Three legislative measures that would help military service members and veterans advanced in Senate Committees this week. These include a resolution sponsored by Senator Mike Bell (R-Riceville) asking Congress and President Obama to review and revise the law and policy regarding the carrying of firearms by military service members on military installations or facilities. Bell said the revisions are needed so that personnel can both help prevent and more readily defend themselves from terrorist attacks.

The Department of Defense restricts the carrying of firearms and the use of deadly force by military and civilian personnel on military installations through the issuance of Directive 5210.56. Senate Joint Resolution 391 comes after acts of domestic terrorism occurred on military facilities including Fort Hood in 2009, a Little Rock military recruiting center in 2009, the Washington Navy Yard in 2013 and Chattanooga on July 16, 2015. The resolution recognizes the mounting threat of domestic attacks inspired by Islamic State and also encourages the Secretary of Defense to review and revise the directive to reduce the restrictions currently in place in order to protect U.S. Armed Forces personnel.

Having met the approval of the Senate Finance, Ways and Means Committee, the resolution now goes to the Senate floor for final approval.

Legislation was approved in the Senate Commerce and Labor Committee on Tuesday to protect National Guard reservists from losing their jobs in connection with their service. State law currently provides protection for residents who take a leave of absence in accordance with orders from the Tennessee Army and Air National Guard; however the protections are not provided to reservists who work here but serve in another state’s reserves. Senate Bill 1444 extends the protection to members of the Army or Air National Guard of any other state.

This bill now moves to the Senate Finance, Ways and Means Committee for consideration of its fiscal impact.

The Senate Education Committee voted to give in-state tuition and fees to dependent children of military parents if the parent perished as the result of a targeted attack that occurred in Tennessee, regardless of their place of residency. Senate Bill 1431 would affect the children of the five military service members who perished in the Chattanooga terrorist attack.

The Chattanooga terrorist attack victims, Marine Gunnery Sergeant Thomas J. Sullivan, Marine Staff Sergeant David A. Wyatt, Marine Sergeant Carson A. Holmquist, Navy Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Randall Smith, and Lance Corporal Squire K. Wells, were mentioned by Governor Haslam in his State of the State Address this week. The Governor said that his budget proposal will include homeland security upgrades for the military department. Some of the security measures could include installation of new barriers, security cameras and magnetic locks.

In other news regarding veterans this week, Northeast State Community College will become the thirteenth campus in Tennessee to receive a VETS Campus designation. The Veterans Education Transition Support (VETS) Act, sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), encourages enrollment of veterans and removes barriers known to impede their success in attaining higher education credentials. The “VETS Campus” designation recognizes and promotes schools that make veteran enrollment a priority. Higher education institutions that satisfy veteran-friendly criteria, such as specialized orientation and the availability of mentoring programs, can receive the designation.

Austin Peay State University, Chattanooga State Community College, Cleveland State Community College, East Tennessee State University, Middle Tennessee State University, Pellissippi State Community College, Tennessee State University, Tennessee Technological University, University of Memphis, University of Tennessee, Volunteer State Community College and Walter State Community College are already recognized as VETS Campuses.

In Brief

Teachers / Sexual Offenses — Legislation was approved by the Senate Education Committee this week that requires a teacher who is convicted of a misdemeanor sexual offense with a student to forfeit retirement benefits under any plan within the Tennessee Consolidated Retirement System (TCRS). Senate Bill 1656, sponsored by Senator Jim Tracy (R-Shelbyville), applies to teachers joining the TCRS on or after July 1, 2016. TCRS pensions are already forfeited for felons if the act in which they were convicted was job related. The bill now goes to the Senate floor for a final vote.

E-Verify — In the Senate Commerce and Labor Committee, members voted to approve a bill to put some teeth into Tennessee’s E-Verify law. Under current law, all private employers with six or more employees must register and utilize E-Verify or request and maintain one of the listed identity/employment authorization documents from a newly hired employee or non-employee to ensure the applicant is in the U.S. legally. Senate Bill 1965 provides that any employer with 25 or more employees must enroll in the online E-Verify system, removing an option that maintaining paper documents is sufficient for compliance. The bill decreases from 60 to 30 the number of days that an employer has to remedy a non-compliance finding after receipt of an initial order for violation of the state’s E-Verify requirements. It also creates an additional $500 civil penalty per day if the employer fails to use E-Verify or provide an affidavit of undue hardship. The legislation is designed to target bad actors who find it more advantageous to pay a one-time $500 fine for hiring illegal aliens than to follow Tennessee’s E-Verify law. The bill is sponsored by Senator Jim Tracy (R-Shelbyville) and now goes to the Senate floor for consideration by the full Senate.

Roddie Edmonds Honored for Heroism — The State Senate honored Army Master Sargent Roddie Edmonds this week in a resolution recognizing his heroism in saving the lives of 200 Jewish-American soldiers. Edmonds, a Knoxville native, was the senior leader of POWs captured by Germans in World War II at the Battle of the Bulge. When a gun was placed to his head and he was asked to identify American-Jewish captives serving with him, Edmonds refused saying, “We are all Jews here.” The Nazi officer relented due to Edmonds heroic action saving the Jewish American POWs from being separated and transported to slave labor camps, concentrations camps or worse. Edmonds passed away in 1985 but he is being honored posthumously by Israel’s Righteous Among Nations for his actions. Senate Joint Resolution 454 is sponsored by Senator Doug Overbey (R-Maryville).

Prescription Drug Abuse — The Senate Health Committee approved legislation designed to reduce the rampant overprescribing of pain killers across the state by enhancing oversight of pain management clinics. Senate Bill 1466, sponsored by Senators Randy McNally (R-Oak Ridge), Ken Yager (R-Kingston) and Rusty Crowe (R-Johnson City), reflects negotiations with stakeholders that empower the state to accomplish this task without overburdening those physicians whom are providing quality care to their patients. Tennessee is still a close second behind Alabama as the worst state in the nation for the use of opioids per capita despite improvements made as a result of the General Assembly’s efforts to attack the problem. The bill now goes to the Senate Finance, Ways and Means Committee for approval.

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Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris responds to Governor Haslam’s Statement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE November 16, 2015
Contact: Alex Lewis Phone: (615) 741-1967

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — “In light of Governor Haslam’s statement this afternoon that he has determined it best to suspend refugee placements in Tennessee ‘until states can become more of a partner in the vetting process,’ I have today called upon the Chairman of the Senate State and Local Government Committee, Senator Ken Yager, to convene our Committee for the purpose of taking testimony from the Department of Safety and Homeland Security, Department of the Military, the Tennessee Office for Refugees and others concerning the process by which resettlement may take place, if at all, what safeguards are in place, and what more can be done to provide assurance that appropriate safeguards are in place.

“Our primary concern is the safety of Tennesseans during this global conflict and to provide reassurance that all steps necessary to provide public safety are undertaken without delay.”

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Norris News from Nashville – November 10, 2015

 

Student veterans Chris Fears and Adam Martin with Senator Norris

Student veterans Chris Fears and Adam Martin with Senator Norris

Veterans Deserve Our Support for Their Service

One of my pet peeves is politicians and others who confuse Veterans Day with Memorial Day.

This Veterans Day, watch for well-meaning, but mistaken, email and social media blasts giving thanks “to those who made the ultimate sacrifice and paid the ultimate price.” That’s sentiment best saved for Memorial Day when, in May of each year, we remember those either killed in action or who have died since their days of service.

My father was a B-24 pilot who served in World War II, and he died more than 50 years ago. I honor his service on Memorial Day.

Fortunately, my father-in-law is still living. He is an Air Force Veteran who served in Korea. I honor his service on Veterans Day.

Veterans Day is for the living. It’s a day to focus on what we can do to recognize, thank and support our veterans. Not only those retired, but those of working age.

The Tennessee General Assembly is working to reduce unemployment among our veterans. Not only through programs like Paychecks for Patriots, but through initiatives to equip them with the tools they need to earn better paychecks.

A recent survey showed that, at 9.7%, Tennessee had the fourth highest veteran unemployment rate in the country. This is unacceptable. The national average is 6.5%.

Ironically, veterans are often the most highly skilled and well-trained workforce available. But for the lack of a relevant certificate or meaningful college degree in too many cases, they are ready to seize better employment opportunities which abound.

The resurgence of modern manufacturing and rising demand for skilled labor in Tennessee is a perfect opportunity. Here’s what we’re doing to help our vets maximize this opportunity.

First, we enacted the Veterans Education Transition Support (VETS) Act which I championed in 2013 to establish VETS-friendly campuses in Tennessee.

Last Saturday, during the University of Memphis – Navy game, I was honored to present the University of Memphis its VETS campus designation certificate. Two student veterans, Chris Fears and Adam Martin, proudly stood on Rex Dockery Field at the Liberty Bowl with me.

The VETS Campus designation means the college or university has streamlined the admissions process and increased outreach to veterans through priority placement creating an environment in which veteran students have the resources to succeed and excel.

Specific requirements include annual surveys of veteran students, targeted orientation programs, and mentoring and support services developed specifically for students who are veterans.

The Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC) administers the VETS Campus program and certifies the designation to campuses that meet the requirements specified by the VETS Act. To date, 12 campuses, including the University of Memphis and the University of Tennessee Center for Health Sciences, have earned this designation, and veteran enrollment is increasing.

Second, I enacted Public Chapter 219 this year which focuses on “prior learning assessment.” This new law develops the award of credit toward a certificate or degree for actual experience during service. For example, if a veteran was a diesel mechanic, aviation specialist, welder or otherwise had special training and experience in service, that prior learning should count for credit toward a certificate of degree.

Student veterans at Chattanooga State Community College VETS ceremony

Student veterans at Chattanooga State Community College VETS ceremony

Third, this year’s budget included special funding for veterans education. $1 million was provided to 11 schools including the University of Memphis to help “Vets Reconnect.”

Finally, in order to ensure that eligible veterans in Shelby, Fayette and Tipton County have access to the long-term care and rehabilitation services they have earned and deserve, we are working hard to build a new State Veterans Home in West Tennessee.

Under a budget amendment which I sponsored, the General Assembly has now allocated sufficient funds to acquire property upon which a 148 bed facility will be built. A site in Arlington, Tennessee has been identified and will soon be acquired.

veterans home 008

With help from the Plough Foundation, the volunteer West Tennessee Veterans Home Board (veterans-home.com), Shelby County Government and private donors, we are well on our way to raising the funds necessary to match the additional state and federal funding which will be required for construction.

This Veterans Day, let’s thank the living for their service. Hire a veteran. Contribute to the West Tennessee Veterans Home. Our veterans risked their lives for us. Now it’s our turn to help make their lives better. It’s the least we can do.

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Norris News from Nashville – October 16, 2015

October 16, 2015

Motorcycle Rally for Veterans Event Tomorrow

Motorcycle Rally for Veterans Event Tomorrow

NASHVILLE — The West Tennessee Veterans Home proposed for construction in Shelby County will get a lift from patriotic bikers tomorrow, October 16, from hundreds who will rally to raise awareness and funds on a 30-mile ride from Collierville to Millington.

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville) will lead the pack on his Shadow as the rally departs for the Naval Air Station at Millington from Carriage Crossing in Collierville at 10:30AM tomorrow.

“We will show Washington how much we care for the 70,000 Veterans living in Shelby, Tipton and Fayette Counties who’ve earned our devotion to this cause,” said Norris. “We must show Nashville, too,” said Norris who oversaw funding by the General Assembly to acquire the land where the planned 148 bed facility will be built.

The State of Tennessee will fund about $10 million of the cost of construction once $15.2 million of private and local funds can be raised. Shelby County government has allocated $2 million. The Plough Foundation has pledged another $2 million, and some $2 million in additional private pledges and donations have been raised.

The Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association Chapter 18-6, a not-for-profit Veterans Association, will host the ride from Collierville to Millington tomorrow. As many as 500 motorcycles plan to participate.

Registration opens at Carriage Crossing in Collierville at 7AM. The ride will depart at 10:30AM.

“I appreciate the Combat Veterans and their service then and now,” said Norris.

LEAP grants aim to fill void in Tennessee workforce

LIVINGSTON — On a bright October morning in a small town about half an hour northeast of Cookeville, Bob Young pulled a student out of class at the local technical college for a job interview.

Young has come to depend on students from the Tennessee College of Applied Technology at Livingston to help out at his small business, which manufactures metal goods for the automotive industry. The students have interned there for a few years, and when there’s a job opening, they are the go-to candidates.

The impromptu meeting delighted government officials who were visiting the TCAT last week to celebrate its new mechatronics program, which Young helped develop. It’s one of several programs paid for by $10 million in state funding that is meant to fill a void of qualified workers that lawmakers, education leaders and industry officials say was frustrating Tennessee manufacturers while keeping other companies away from the Volunteer State.

That money went toward 12 Labor Education Alignment Program grants, which the state awarded last year to regional teams across Tennessee that included representatives from colleges, businesses and school systems. Many of the grants paid for mechatronics equipment that replicates the robotic fixtures of a modern assembly line.

Lillian Hartgrove with the Highlands Economic Partnership said local businesses had been complaining for about three years that potential employees lacked hands-on mechatronics experience.

“We kept hearing it, and we knew it was escalating for us,” she said. “But we didn’t have the money. We didn’t have the funding to be able to go forth and implement.”

State Sen. Mark Norris, R-Collierville, who sponsored the LEAP legislation in 2013, said he was motivated by similar complaints in West Tennessee. A Unilever plant in Covington initially had trouble filling positions with qualified workers. The company partnered with Dyersburg State Community College to create a curriculum that would pump more qualified workers into their pool.

That local model, Norris said, inspired the statewide approach. During an event celebrating Livingston’s LEAP grant, Russ Deaton, interim executive director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, said employers throughout the state would soon reap the benefits.

“We recognize that there is a disconnect in our past, sometimes, between industry workforce needs and education,” Deaton said. “This is part of that solution. This is part of us solving that problem.”

Article first published in The Tennessean on October 12th.

Attending Governor's Economic Development Conference with Jean Majeau, VP Kruger inc., Susan Maynor, Greater Memphis Chamber, and Gwen Fischer, Regional Dir. of TN Department of Economic and Community Development

Attending Governor’s Economic Development Conference with Jean Majeau, VP Kruger inc., Susan Maynor, Greater Memphis Chamber, and Gwen Fischer, Regional Dir. of TN Department of Economic and Community Development

Broadband in Tennessee Topic of TACIR Meeting
Study to facilitate internet access initiated by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris

The Tennessee Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations (TACIR) will hear from a panel of broadband providers, users and others regarding broadband development and deployment in Tennessee as part of a study now underway. The study was initiated by TACIR Chairman and Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville).

The meeting will take place on October 21 at 1:00 pm CST in Room 30 of the Legislative Plaza.

“This is an important undertaking,” said Leader Norris. “Internet access, and the broadband we need to provide it, is critical to commerce and quality of life, especially in our rural communities. In addition to the general public’s need for reliable access, broadband is essential to the state’s education and economic development efforts. We hope this study will help to provide a clear path forward to increase reliable access statewide.”

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) defines broadband as “high-speed Internet access that is always on and faster than the traditional dial-up access.” High-speed transmission technologies associated with broadband include digital subscriber line (DSL), cable modem, fiber, wireless, satellite, and broadband over power lines (BPL). Norris said the study includes the extent and quality of coverage, factors that affect the cost of deploying broadband, tax policy, and barriers to expansion by public and private providers, including pole attachment rates and governmental requirements by public and private providers. It will also encompass best practices by other states to provide broadband services.

Two panels, one representing the interests of broadband providers and the other representing the interests of users and the broader community will present information to members of TACIR. Those speaking on behalf of broadband providers are Levoy Knowles, Executive Director of the Tennessee Telecommunications Association; Joelle Phillips, President of AT&T, Tennessee; Ken Webb, President and CEO of Cleveland Utilities; Ben Lovins, Senior Vice President, Telecommunications Division of the Jackson Energy Authority; as well as representatives from the Tennessee Electric Cooperative Association and the Tennessee Cable Telecommunications Association.

Speaking on behalf of the communities and broadband users are Amy New, Assistant Commissioner of Rural Development for the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development; Sgt. Ehrin Ehlert with the Tennessee Highway Patrol; and Marshall Ramsey, President of the Morristown Chamber of Commerce; as well as representatives from the Tennessee Department of Education, Tennessee Board of Regents and the Tennessee Farm Bureau.

Industry and government reports rank Tennessee near the middle of the 50 states in broadband availability.

“Internet access is no longer a luxury,” added Norris. “In addition to being fundamental to the economic growth of our state, broadband access is important in providing more educational opportunities, better job training and advanced telemedicine. I look forward to a healthy exchange of ideas.”

The TACIR report is expected to be completed by the end of 2016.

Co-Executive Producer Joe Lazarov with me on the set of "Still the King." Television, film and music production is big business in Tennessee. We encourage and enable production here. CMT's new Tennessee-based TV series, "Still the King," with Billy Ray Cyrus is now filming in Goodlettsville. 90% of the vendors and crew are Tennesseans. Visited the set this week.

Co-Executive Producer Joe Lazarov with me on the set of “Still the King.” Television, film and music production is big business in Tennessee. We encourage and enable production here. CMT’s new Tennessee-based TV series, “Still the King,” with Billy Ray Cyrus is now filming
in Goodlettsville. 90% of the vendors and crew are Tennesseans. Visited the set this week.

Norris to Speak at Multi-City Summit Grappling with Rape Kit Backlogs

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville) will speak at the second annual Sexual Assault Kit Summit in Memphis on Monday, October 19. He will address a gathering of law enforcement and other officials from across the U.S. regarding progress in processing sexual assault kit evidence in communities with backlogs.

The 2015 Sexual Assault Kit Summit is hosted by the Memphis Sexual Assault Task Force. The first summit, in which Norris also participated, was held in Cleveland, Ohio last year.

“I am pleased to see us coming together again to share information about our progress and what can be done better going forward” said Sen. Norris.

“DNA evidence has revolutionized the way we apprehend and prosecute not only rape cases but many crimes. We have made major progress in the last two years so justice can be served, but we have much more work to do.”

Norris was instrumental in securing recent grant funding for the State of Tennessee and City of Memphis to reduce the number of untested kits in Tennessee. He sponsored major legislation in 2014 to require all local law enforcement agencies to inventory back-logged rape kits across the state. He also sponsored legislation this year establishing procedures for the collection and storage of rape kits and requiring law enforcement agencies to submit kits to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) for testing within 60 days. That law also directs the Domestic Violence State Coordinating Council to develop a model policy for law enforcement agencies to respond to reports of sexual assault and requires law enforcement agencies to adopt a written policy on responding to reports of sexual assaults.

“DNA evidence is not only helpful in identifying perpetrators in unsolved cases, but also prevents future assaults by prosecuting rapists early in their criminal careers,” Norris added. “It is very effective in getting these criminals off the streets.”

Norris will also provide testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday regarding juvenile justice. As Chairman of the Council of State Governments, he initiated a first-of-its-kind study that drew an unprecedented dataset of 1.3 million individual case records spanning eight years, showing youth incarcerated in state-run facilities are 21 percent more likely to be rearrested than those that remain under supervision closer to home. Norris will be talking about the study and what Tennessee can do to reduce recidivism among juvenile offenders.

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CSG Releases Recommendations for Building a Better Workforce

For Immediate Release: September 15, 2015

LEXINGTON, Ky.—The Council of State Governments recently released a report that outlines recommendations for state-level policies that help ensure students are prepared for postsecondary education and the workforce. The report, “A Framework for State Policymakers: Developing Pathways to Ensure a Skilled Workforce for State Prosperity,” is the brainchild of CSG’s 2014 national leaders who sought to help states prepare today’s students for the jobs of tomorrow. Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), who served as CSG’s 2014 national chair, led the State Pathways to Prosperity initiative, a multi-year effort to identify obstacles—and alternative pathways—to prosperity for many Americans.

With the continued commitment and leadership of CSG’s 2015 national chair, New York state Sen. Carl Marcellino, the National Task Force on Workforce Development and Education reviewed barriers to success, including child poverty; hunger and nutrition; veterans’ concerns; and criminal justice issues. The report is the work product of the task force and four subcommittees, representing more than a year of study, dialogue and deliberation by state officials from both parties, all regions of the U.S. and from diverse perspectives.

“Workforce development and relevant education present, at once, some of the greatest challenges—as well as opportunities—of our time,” said Leader Norris. “We all want to see the kind of improvement in quality of life that flows from a skilled workforce gainfully employed in our states. State Pathways to Prosperity is The Council of State Governments’ workforce development and education initiative designed to facilitate that objective.”

“This report reflects CSG’s continuing role in the effort underway across the United States to build a ready workforce equipped with a relevant education to embrace the advanced manufacturing opportunities now returning to our shores,” Norris continued. “In short, this report and its recommendations demonstrate CSG’s commitment to be an active participant in the nationwide effort to close the ‘skills gap’ standing between too many of our citizens and opportunities for meaningful employment.”

David Adkins, CSG’s executive director, commended all the leaders and experts whose work is reflected in the contents of the report, which is available for download at www.csg.org/StatePathwaystoProsperity.

“State leaders are keenly interested in growing state economies,” Adkins said. “They have consistently heard from businesses large and small that one of the greatest impediments to business expansion is the lack of an adequately trained workforce.”

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September 4, 2015

Happy Labor Day!

 Covington Mayor Justin Hanson, Director of Covington TCAT Youlanda Jones, Representative Debra Moody with students and instructors

Covington Mayor Justin Hanson, Director of Covington TCAT Youlanda Jones, Representative Debra Moody with students and instructors

Labor Day is a good time to reflect on our progress in workforce development in Tennessee. Unemployment is down, and prospects for new employment opportunities are up.

A good example occurred today with the arrival of modern day technology in Tipton County.

Thanks to the generosity of Bodine Manufacturing of Jackson, Tennessee and Toyota Motor Manufacturing of Georgetown, Kentucky, automotive technology students at Covington’s College of Applied Technology will have 21st Century technology with which to learn.

Automotive technology students with Senator Norris at Covington TCAT

Automotive technology students with Senator Norris at Covington TCAT

Toyota donated a 2013 Toyota Camry and a 2014 Toyota Camry Hybrid to TCAT Covington, and the vehicles were received at a ribbon cutting ceremony we were excited to attend.

Putting Tennesseans to work means more than just finding a job these days. It means making sure we have the skills necessary to do the jobs that are available including those in advanced industries and manufacturing.

Donated Toyota Camry Hybrid

Donated Toyota Camry Hybrid

Covington TCAT’s program teaches current methods of servicing and maintaining today’s automobiles. Students receive practical experience using computerized engine testers, front-end alignment machines, brake repair equipment, and other specialty machines.

There are approximately 2750 automotive service technicians and mechanics working in West Tennessee today. The demand is growing and will increase by nearly 1,000 in the next 7 years.

The most modern car TCAT Covington had until today was a 2003. That wasn’t good enough given automotive advances during the last decade.

 Covington TCAT Director Youlanda Jones, General Manager of Toyota Bodine in Jackson, Shawn Daly and Senator Norris

Covington TCAT Director Youlanda Jones, General Manager of
Toyota Bodine in Jackson, Shawn Daly and Senator Norris

Tonight, TCAT Covington has new technology to offer its students. They’ve truly moved into the 21st Century thanks to Toyota.

Thanks to everyone for working together for the promise of a more prosperous tomorrow in Tennessee this Labor Day and every day as we proceed.

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NORRIS SAYS TENNESSEE’S RANKING ON CHILD WELL-BEING IS UNACCEPTABLE

NASHVILLE—Following the release of a report ranking Tennessee 36th in overall child well-being, Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville) called on his legislative colleagues and the Haslam Administration to focus more effectively on the needs of the state’s youth.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation this week issued a report ranking states based on four factors related to children: economic well-being, education, health, and family and community support. “The good news is we’ve improved significantly across the board in health and education, but we need to improve in critical areas where more reform is needed. We pride ourselves in being number one in all sorts of categories,” Norris said Thursday. “But we need to do better when it comes to the next generation of Tennesseans. Our children need to be nurtured as though our very lives depend upon them, because they do.”

Norris said more needs to be done to fund education, reform the juvenile justice system, and improve nutrition in order to substantially improve. In 2014, Norris spearheaded a national workforce development and education initiative called “State Pathways to Prosperity” in his former capacity as chairman of the Council of State Governments (CSG), which will hold its national convention in Nashville from Dec. 10 to Dec. 13.

Norris says the link between each state’s economic performance and quality-of-life hinges on the degree to which children’s needs and potential are addressed.

One of his areas of focus has been juvenile recidivism. Norris obtained private funding for a study by the CSG Justice Center earlier this year, which revealed an urgent need for Tennessee to do better at keeping youth out of jail.

“The state is not adequately capturing the data needed to avoid the revolving door of juvenile incarceration,” Norris said. “And it is not impacting the underlying causes of juvenile delinquency, which often stem from the neurological consequences of the toxic environments too many Tennessee children find themselves in today.”

Norris also spearheaded startup funding for the Center for Justice Involved Youth at the University of Tennessee Center for Health Sciences this year.

Norris will also lead a team of judges, juvenile administrators, and legislators at a summit in Austin, TX in November. Sponsored by the CSG Justice Center and the MacArthur Foundation, this first-of-its-kind, invitation-only forum intends to help key policymakers in all 50 states develop or improve plans to reduce recidivism and improve other outcomes for youth based on evidence-based practices.

“Anything less is cultivating a culture of malaise and mediocrity,” said Norris. “Address it now, or pay for it later when the price may be too high and it’s too late.”

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mnorris 4th 9388

July 3, 2015

Happy Independence Day!

As we approach July 4th and celebrate the birth of our nation 239 years ago, we celebrate many freedoms for which the United States of America is revered throughout the world.

This year, in the aftermath of the carnage in South Carolina and the Supreme Court’s recent rulings construing the Affordable Care Act and approving same-sex marriage, we are reminded of the importance of freedom of speech, freedom of association, freedom of religion and the rule of law. We cannot take these freedoms, or the system of justice which protects them, for granted.

Councilor David Coty, the Mayor of Runnymede, invited me to join him, members of Parliament and UK legislative and judicial branches with others to celebrate the 800th Anniversary of the sealing of Magna Carta in the English County of Surrey on June 15th.

Councilor David Coty, the Mayor of Runnymede, invited me to join him, members of Parliament and UK legislative and judicial branches with others to celebrate the 800th Anniversary of the sealing of Magna Carta in the English County of Surrey on June 15th.

800 years ago, on June 15, 1215, Magna Carta was sealed under duress at Runnymede by King John. In it was sown the seed of constitutional government – “freedom under law.” Standing for the proposition that no man is above the law, the concept of “law of the land” first took root from which our own Declaration of Independence drew inspiration in 1776. “Due process of law” was later enshrined in our own Bill of Rights.

Scarcely 20 years later, on June 1, 1796, the State of Tennessee was admitted into the Union as the 16th state by an Act of Congress signed by none other than our Founding Father, George Washington. His bust stands in the Tennessee Capitol stairwell which leads up to the Senate and House Chambers where busts of other historical figures are also displayed.

Between the time of the Declaration of Independence and Tennessee’s statehood, the U.S. Constitution was ratified on June 21, 1788, and the Bill of Rights was ratified in 1791. Today, our Constitution is the oldest written constitution still in force anywhere in the world.

In June, I traveled to Great Britain, where history is measured not in hundreds of years but thousands of years, to celebrate Magna Carta and commemorate its sealing. I met with members of the European Union, Members of Parliament, foreign secretaries and former Secretaries of State. We talked about whether it’s likely the UK will secede from the European Union; whether ISIS or Putin is the bigger threat to Europe. Regardless, everyone with whom I spoke said the greatest threat to Europe is the lack of American leadership.

Rep. Karen Camper and I attended a Global Security Conference at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. last month. Cyber-security was a hot topic. The University of Memphis is engaged in teaching and research to help combat this growing threat.

Rep. Karen Camper and I attended a Global Security Conference at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. last month. Cyber-security was a hot topic. The University of Memphis is engaged in teaching and research to help combat this growing threat.

To see us wrestle with notions of liberty and freedom itself is heartening in light of what I witnessed overseas. Here, we debate whether to remove statues. There, they debate what can be done to stop ISIS and Putin who destroy statues. Here, we defend our Flag and our ways of life like none other.

On this Fourth of July, we learn how to adapt without acquiescing; to respect the rights of others and ourselves to disagree. To stand up for our beliefs.

I was honored to address the Cook Chapter of the Air Force Association at the 164th Airlift Wing in Memphis last week.

I was honored to address the Cook Chapter of the Air Force Association at the 164th Airlift Wing in Memphis last week.

Unfortunately, the rulings raise more questions than they resolve for those of us who enact, practice or apply the law and others.

I disagree with Justice Roberts’ opinion in King v. Burwell, and I was quoted correctly: “It may be judicial sleight of hand, but it’s the law of the land.”

And I disagree with Justice Kennedy that the Supreme Court should disenfranchise 80% of Tennesseans who felt strongly enough to amend their Constitution now to no avail.

But I agree with Justice Kennedy that we must uphold the First Amendment freedoms of all Americans regardless:

“The First Amendment ensures that religious organizations and persons are given proper protection as they seek to teach the principles that are so fulfilling and so central to their lives and faiths, and to their own deep aspirations to continue the family structure they have long revered.”

Eighth Annual Tracy DeWitt Patriotic Breakfast with Northeast Shelby Republican Club and Rep. Ron Lollar in Bartlett last Saturday. Pictured here with Jackson Viox.

Eighth Annual Tracy DeWitt Patriotic Breakfast with Northeast Shelby Republican Club and Rep. Ron Lollar in Bartlett last Saturday. Pictured here with Jackson Viox.

It is for us, then, this Fourth of July, to take strength from our history and firmly resolve to defend our freedoms while working together to strengthen them for our future as “one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

New Tennessee Reconnect Provides Path to Economic Freedom this Independence Day

Independence Day 2015 has added significance for Tennesseans seeking the freedom which flows from gainful employment this year.

As of July 1, thanks to legislation championed by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), a new program enabling adults to obtain the degree necessary for a better job is available.

Public Chapter 363 (SB605), more commonly known as Tennessee Reconnect, is a major part of Tennessee’s ongoing Drive to 55 program and Tennessee Promise.

Under legislation sponsored by Senator Norris last year, Governor Haslam’s Tennessee Promise made last dollar scholarships for traditional students to attend any of the state’s 13 community colleges, 27 colleges of applied technology (TCATs) or other eligible institutions offering an associate degree program beginning in 2015. Non-traditional students (adults returning to school) were eligible only for TCAT enrollment.

This year’s Public Chapter 363 now extends eligibility for adults to attend Tennessee’s public community colleges in the 2016-2017 academic year to complete their associate’s degree in applied science as well.

“We are closing the skills gap in Tennessee. 21st Century jobs are available, but all too often Tennesseans don’t have the certificate or degree required to fill them. This helps Tennesseans help themselves by making it more affordable to pursue a career in advanced industries,” says Norris who, as Chair of the Council of State Governments, also led a national initiative in workforce development and education called “State Pathways to Prosperity.” He serves on Tennessee’s Workforce Development Board.

Key qualifications to receive the grant include: Tennessee residency for at least one year preceding the date of application for the grant; completion of at least 30 hours towards completing an associate of applied science degree; and, an adjusted gross income of less than $36,000. Grant recipients must maintain a 2.0 GPA and enroll in at least 9 semester hours in the fall and spring semesters.

Co-sponsors were Senators Mark Green (R-Clarksville), John Stevens (R-Huntingdon), Dolores Gresham (R-Somerville) and Ken Yager (R-Kingston).

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tn-state-seal mark norris

SENATE MAJORITY LEADER
STATE OF TENNESSEE9A Legislative Plaza
Nashville, Tennessee 37243
800-449-8366 ext. 11967
615-741-1967
May 26, 2015
The Honorable Beth Harwell
Speaker of the House of Representatives
19 Legislative Plaza
Nashville, TN 37243
CHAIRMAN
RULES
MEMBER
FINANCE, WAYS AND MEANS
STATE & LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Dear Speaker Harwell:

Concern arising from the recent introduction of a new state “logo” is the reason I’m writing you
today. You and I understand that Governor Haslam has no intention of attempting to replace the
Flag of Tennessee, but most Tennesseans do not.

The Salute to the Flag of Tennessee is codified at Tenn. Code Ann. § 4-1-329. Two years ago, as
Chairman of the Senate Rules Committee, I moved to amend the Senate’s rules to include the
statutory Salute to the Flag of Tennessee as we convene each session. It affirms our support for
the “three white stars on a field of blue” which so many fear are now under siege.

It seems to me that we can demonstrate a unified front in supporting our Flag if the House of
Representatives joins us; that is, if both House and Senate recite the Salute following the Pledge
of Allegiance, there can be no doubt of the entire General Assembly’s support.

I hope you agree that joining in the Salute is the right thing to do.

Yours sincerely,

image-signature

Mark Norris
Senator


May 26, 2015

image tn flag

Dear Fellow Tennessean:

“Three white stars on a field of blue

God keep them strong and ever true

It is with pride and love that we

Salute the Flag of Tennessee.”

In 2013, as Chairman of the Senate Rules Committee, I took action to insure that we recite the above Salute to the Flag of Tennessee (Tenn. Code Ann. § 4-1-329) at the opening of each session in the State Senate. We’ve done it ever since.

Concern arising from the recent introduction of a new state “logo” which eliminates the three white stars is the reason I’m writing you today.

Make no mistake, the Governor has no intention of replacing our beloved state flag, and no Executive Order can take it away, but Tennesseans are concerned!

Rest assured, the Tennessee General Assembly stands by our beloved State Flag.

While the State Senate salutes the Tennessee State Flag and its three white stars every day following the Pledge of Allegiance, the House of Representatives does not yet do so. I know members of the House of Representatives care to respect and preserve our Tennessee heritage as much as we in the Senate do.

That’s why I’ve written House Speaker Beth Harwell to suggest that she join us by leading the House in saluting the Flag of Tennessee as we do.

Departments’ logos may come and go, but the General Assembly will continue to honor the Stars of Tennessee and the Flag that protects them.

For, “It is with pride and love that we salute the Flag of Tennessee.”

Respectfully yours,

Mark

 

 

 

Mark Norris
Senator


 

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

“I have no illusions about what little I can add now to the silent testimony of those who gave their lives willingly for their country. Words are even more feeble on this Memorial Day, for the sight before us is that of a strong and good nation that stands in silence and remembers those who were loved and who, in return, loved their countrymen enough to die for them.” ~ Ronald Reagan

April 27, 2015

Mark Norris

“As the dust settles, Tennesseans will see that we focused on employment, education and economic development. This budget, and the legislation supporting it, represents a strong return on the taxpayers’ investment.”

-Mark Norris

Lawmakers Adjourn 2015 Legislative Session

The 2015 session of the 109th General Assembly has adjourned to become a part of Tennessee history with some of the most important bills of the year being approved during the final week of legislative action. This includes legislation repealing Common Core, a bill to implement an online verification program for uninsured motorists, a measure to give more senior citizens Hall Income Tax relief and an act dealing with Transportation Network Company (TNC) services.

Senate Approves Legislation Implementing an Online Verification Program for Uninsured Motorists

A major bill establishing an online verification program to help ensure compliance with Tennessee’s Financial Responsibility Law was approved by the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 648, sponsored by Senator Bill Ketron (R-Murfreesboro), aims to reduce the state’s uninsured motorist rate, which is currently at 23-24 percent.

There are approximately 40,000 crashes a year that involve uninsured motorists.

Tennessee law requires drivers to have a driver’s license, vehicle registration and insurance; however, there is no verification system to track the insurance requirement. The bill requires that a notice procedure be provided to any driver found to be uninsured, allowing them 15 days to provide proof of insurance or exemption. If there is no response, the owner will be sent a second notice stating that they have 30 days to provide proof of insurance. Failure to comply will result in a $25 coverage failure fee on the first notification and a $100 fee on the second. The bill also increases the fine for failure to provide proof of insurance from $100 to $300, and if a driver fails to provide proof of insurance to an officer, the officer may tow the vehicle as long as the officer’s agency has adopted a policy for such procedure.

Forty-six other states have similar auto liability verification systems.

“I am very pleased this bill has passed in Tennessee. It will make our streets safer and will hopefully save lives as well,” Ketron said.

More Senior Citizens Can Qualify for Hall Income Tax Relief Under Legislation Approved by the General Assembly

The Senate has approved legislation, sponsored by Senator Doug Overbey (R-Maryville) and Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), which raises the Hall Income Tax exemption level for citizens over the age of 55 to allow more senior citizens to qualify tax relief. The Hall Income Tax levies six percent on earnings from stocks and bonds, with 3/8 of the revenue going to cities and counties.

The legislature voted to raise the level which allows more senior citizens to be exempt in 2011 and 2013, with current income exemption levels at $33,000 per individual and $59,000 per couple. Under Senate Bill 32, the annual Hall Income Tax standard income exemption for taxpayers 65 years of age or older would be $37,000 for single filers and $68,000 for joint filer taxpayers beginning in January 2016.

Of the individuals who pay the tax, Overbey said almost half are age 65 and older.

The bill now goes to Governor Bill Haslam for his signature.

The adjournment resolution for the 2015 session of the One Hundred Ninth General Assembly

The adjournment resolution for the 2015 session of the One Hundred Ninth General Assembly

Lawmakers Approve Transportation Network Company Services Act

Legislation which establishes requirements governing application-based Transportation Network Companies (TNC) was approved by the General Assembly on the closing day of the 2015 legislative session. Senate Bill 907, sponsored by Speaker Pro Tempore Bo Watson (R-Hixson), provides statewide rules for TNC ride-hauling services, like those offered by Uber and Lyft.

“Once this bill is enacted, TNCs will be able to continue safely and responsibly to grow jobs and improve accessibility to affordable and reliable transportation to millions of Tennesseans who are using this tool to change the face of commerce and change the face of the marketplace,” said Watson.

The legislation establishes end-to-end insurance coverage for the transportation networks and their drivers with $1 million liability coverage while a pre-arranged ride is occurring. This is ten times what is required under the current taxi system. It also requires a zero tolerance policy for the use of drugs and alcohol and mandates comprehensive background checks on all drivers.

“At the end of the day, the number one requirement that we have is the health and safety of our citizens,” Watson continued. “This legislation ensures transparency and safety requirements that protect both the riders and the drivers and requires the TNCs to fully comply in any law enforcement investigation.”

The bill now goes to Governor Bill Haslam for his signature.

General Assembly Passes the Individualized Education Act for Students with Special Needs

In last week action, the Senate and House of Representatives passed the Individualized Education Act giving new hope to special needs students across the Volunteer State, one in three of whom currently do not graduate from high school. Senate Bill 27, sponsored by Senate Education Committee Chairman Dolores Gresham (R-Somerville), will provide pathways to customized education for students with special needs, giving parents the flexibility to direct their child’s funding to the schools, courses, programs and services that best fit the learning needs of their child through an Individualized Education Account (IEA).

Gresham said the bill is designed to help children with the most severe disabilities whose current school situation is not meeting their needs. In order to be eligible to participate in an IEA, a student must have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) which is a document which maps out how a school will meet the needs of students receiving special education services as required under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). The bill would only apply to students with autism, deafness or other hearing impairments, intellectual disabilities, orthopedic impairments, traumatic brain injuries, and blindness or other visual impairments.

The Individualized Education Act provides for the Department of Education to deduct up to four percent from IEA funds to cover the costs of administering the program. Both the state and local school districts are projected to save money under the program. The Individualized Education Act also:

  • Requires the Department to ensure funds are used only for educational purposes;
  • Provides parents with a written explanation of the allowable uses of the money and their responsibilities;
  • Provides for random, quarterly and annual audits;
  • Sets up fraud reporting; and
  • Has the ability to suspend or terminate any school or provider that fails to comply.

The State Board of Education will consult with the Department of Education to promulgate rules for the application and approval process for non-public school and providers to participate in the program. The bill requires participating student to partake in annual testing with results to be reported. The legislation now goes to Governor Bill Haslam for his signature.

House Majority Leader Gerald McCormick, Speaker of the House Beth Harwell, Governor Bill Haslam, Lt. Governor Ron Ramsey and Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris at the annual end of session press conference.

House Majority Leader Gerald McCormick, Speaker of the House Beth Harwell, Governor Bill Haslam, Lt. Governor Ron Ramsey and Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris at the annual end of session press conference.

In Brief…

STEM Hubs — Legislation designed to amplify and accelerate regional STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education in Tennessee was approved by lawmakers during the closing week of the legislative session. Senate Bill 453, sponsored by Senator Todd Gardenhire (R-Chattanooga) and Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), requires the Tennessee STEM Innovation Network to establish a STEM innovation hub that is dedicated to serving rural areas of Tennessee, including the northwest portion of the state. It also calls for making a curriculum available to all middle schools that educate students on the variety and benefits of STEM careers. “These programs prime the pump with the talent we need in Tennessee’s 21st Century workforce,” said Norris.

Electronic Driver’s Licenses — The full Senate approved and sent to the governor legislation which allows the Department of Safety and Homeland Security to develop an electronic driver’s license system. The system would allow citizens to use a mobile application, instead of a physical driver’s license, to present evidence of a valid Tennessee driver’s license. Under Senate Bill 651, sponsored by Senator Ed Jackson (R-Jackson), citizens would not be required to use the electronic driver’s license; rather, they would have to have the choice of an electronic, physical or both forms. The states of Iowa, Delaware and Arizona are also moving forward with similar legislation.

HOPE Scholarships / Military Children – Legislation was approved this week that specifies that dependent children of members of the Armed Forces and the Tennessee National Guard whose home of record is Tennessee must qualify as in-state students for purposes of the HOPE Scholarship. Senate Bill 461 closes a loophole so that children who move due to their parent’s deployment or reassignment would not be penalized and charged out-of-state tuition in Tennessee’s colleges and universities. The bill is sponsored by Senator Mike Bell (R-Riceville).

Civics Education — Legislation which would promote civics education in Tennessee has passed the General Assembly. Senate Bill 10 would make components of the test administered by the United State Citizenship and Immigration Services to those seeking citizenship one of the tools used in assessing student progress under Tennessee’s civics education program. The legislation calls on local education agencies to utilize 25 to 50 of the 100 questions posed by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in the citizenship test. The test, which would be administered during high school, may be taken by the student multiple times until he or she scores the 70 percent minimum required for graduation. Students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) would be exempt from the requirement under certain circumstances as provided by the bill. Students will continue to receive the project-based civics assessments provided under a 2012 law. The bill is sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville).

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Arthritis Foundation

For Immediate Release Contact: Melissa LaBonge
April 21, 2015 [email protected]
615.806.8540

PATIENT ADVOCATES TESTIFY IN SUPPORT OF BIOSIMILAR LEGISLATION
Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris and Chairman Cameron Sexton Meet with Patients

Nashville, TN – Patient advocates with the Arthritis Foundation testified before the House Health Subcommittee in support of House Bill 572 and also attended the full House Health and Senate Health and Welfare Committees to support House Bill 572 and its Senate counterpart, Senate Bill 984.

L‐R:Dewayne Bryant, Trish Bryant, Emma Bryant, Majority Leader Mark Norris, Melissa LaBonge – Arthritis Foundation and Kelly Rach

L‐R:Dewayne Bryant, Trish Bryant, Emma Bryant, Majority Leader Mark Norris, Melissa LaBonge – Arthritis Foundation and Kelly Rach

If passed and signed into law, this legislation will allow for Tennessee physicians and patients to have access to new and potentially less costly biosimilar therapies deemed “interchangeable” by the FDA. However, even the slightest variation between an interchangeable biosimilar and the innovator biologic means that these medications can have different dosing, side effects and reactions. As such, this legislation will also ensure that pharmacists communicate to prescribing physicians any biosimilar substitutions at the pharmacy level.

While at the Capitol testifying their support, patient advocates also met with several legislators including bill sponsors Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris and House Health Committee Chairman Cameron Sexton to share their stories and thank them for their leadership on this legislation.

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris said, “This puts Tennessee in the forefront of states fighting to give constituents real access to affordable health care. By facilitating substitution of the most modern medications, we enhance more cost effective treatment which benefits providers and patients alike.”

House Health Committee Chairman Cameron Sexton said, “These pharmaceutical products are a lot of times the last line of defense against certain medical conditions and are life-­changing for the individuals who are on them. Anything we can do to help improve communication between healthcare providers and patients, availability and cost savings will greatly aide our state and families.”

Dewayne Bryant said, “Without these life altering medications, we can’t imagine how she would be today. As her parents and caretakers, we want to be informed if there is a substitution of any medication she currently takes‐especially when they are as complex and sensitive as biologics.”

Arthritis Foundation patient advocate Kelly Rach added, “At the end of the day, this is about patient safety and having up‐to‐date medical record information. I want to be informed as a patient, and I always want my physician informed if there is a substitution of any medication I’m on, especially medications as complex and sensitive as biologics.”

Claire Carrico also voiced her support for the bill, saying, “As a mom, no one loves or cares for my daughter Madeline like I do and I am very involved in her arthritis treatment, along with her amazing rheumatologist. A simple one-time communication from the pharmacist regarding what is actually being administered to my child should be absolutely reasonable, especially when approximately only one out of every 1,400 prescriptions will be affected.”

L‐R: Melissa LaBonge – Arthritis Foundation, Emma Bryant, Chairman Cameron Sexton, Kelly Rach, Trish Bryant and Dewayne Bryant

L‐R: Melissa LaBonge – Arthritis Foundation, Emma Bryant, Chairman Cameron Sexton, Kelly Rach, Trish Bryant and Dewayne Bryant

L‐R: Chairman Cameron Sexton, Claire Carrico and Madeline Carrico

L‐R: Chairman Cameron Sexton, Claire Carrico and Madeline Carrico

With such complex treatment plans as those for chronic diseases, physicians must know which medication their patient is taking in event that any side effects occur. As such, it is imperative that physicians and patients are aware when an interchangeable biosimilar is substituted for the original biologic, by communicating the specific biologic dispensed. Not only will this communication maintain an accurate medical record, but it will also allow physicians to closely monitor the care and progress of their patients.

Biologics and their biosimilar counterparts hold great promise, but we also must protect patient safety by ensuring pharmacist‐prescriber communication anytime a biosimilar substitution is made. House Bill 572 and Senate Bill 984 will create a clear standard for communication that puts patient safety at the forefront of medical care. The Arthritis Foundation and our patient advocates want to recognize Senate Majority Leader Norris and Chairman Sexton for their outstanding leadership on this biosimilar legislation.

The legislation has passed the House and Senate and now goes to Governor Haslam for his signature.

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Arlington Property Announced as New Site for West Tennessee Veterans Home

Arlington Property Announced as New Site for West Tennessee Veterans Home

The Senate Veterans Subcommittee met on Thursday to hear from officials from the Tennessee State Veterans Homes Board. The committee, chaired by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), was told of the selection of property in Arlington for the new West Tennessee Veterans Home.

The nursing home will house 144 Tennessee veterans of U.S. military service.

There are 70,000 veterans in the Shelby, Tipton and Fayette County area, more than any other area of the state.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs will pay $45.5 million of the Arlington home’s price tag. The state and local governments and private fundraising must generate the remaining $24.5 million before the VA releases its funding for construction.

Shelby County government has allocated $2 million, and the state has allocated $650,000 so far on site selection, planning and preparation. Fundraising efforts are under way by the West Tennessee Veterans Home board, a nonprofit group based in Memphis.

The Tennessee State Veterans Homes Board runs homes in Humboldt, Knoxville and Murfreesboro, and four others are in various stages of planning: 108-bed homes in Clarksville, Cleveland and the Tri-Cities area of northeast Tennessee, and the 144-bed home in Arlington. The Arlington home will be the second in West Tennessee.

Senator Norris, Tara and Byron Mohundro, Amanda Peltz, Senator Kyle, Scott Lillard and Treasurer David Lillard in the Senate Chamber to commemorate Autism Awareness Day in Tennessee

Senator Norris, Tara and Byron Mohundro, Amanda Peltz, Senator Kyle, Scott Lillard and
Treasurer David Lillard in the Senate Chamber to commemorate Autism Awareness Day in Tennessee

State Budget is Central Focus During the Final Weeks of the 2015 legislative session

Action on Capitol Hill continued to shift from committees to the floor of the Senate this week as State Senators worked diligently to approve a number of important bills to help crime victims. The Commerce and Labor Committee, the Education Committee and the Government Operations Committee joined two of the other nine Senate standing committees which have completed their business. Meanwhile, it is the state budget that will be the central focus of attention during the final weeks of the 2015 legislative session.

Budget — Finance and Administration Commissioner Larry Martin briefed members of the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday regarding Governor Bill Haslam’s proposed additions to Senate Bill 1399, the appropriations bill. The supplemental appropriations amendment reflects $30 million more in recurring funding. The proposed budget amendment designates those additional recurring dollars to K-12 education, specifically to increase state funding of health insurance coverage for teachers.

Due to Franchise and Excise tax collections that exceeded estimates last month as a result of an unusual one-time event, along with other revenue collections and program savings, there are nearly $300 million more than anticipated in non-recurring funds. The budget amendment proposes to use the funds as follows: $120 million for a new Tennessee State Museum which will be matched with $40 million in private donations; $50 million for economic development projects to bring more high-quality jobs to Tennessee; $40 million to complete renovations of the Cordell Hull building; $12 million for maintenance and improvements to higher education facilities across the state; $5 million to fund new equipment in Tennessee’s Colleges of Applied Technology to meet job training demands across the state; and $1.9 million for the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services to fund adolescent residential alcohol and drug treatment grants.

The funds would also provide an additional $36.5 million for the Rainy Day Fund, which would double the amount originally proposed in the budget, bringing the total reserve to 4.5 percent of state revenues. The amended proposal also restores full funding to the TennCare Bureau for level two case management services. Nearly half of the funding, $5.2 million, is included as recurring dollars, while the rest of the funding is designated as non-recurring. The administration will continue to review the program and look at possibilities for efficiencies in the process.

The budget bill, sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), is scheduled for consideration by the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday.

Presenting the Sexual Assault Kit Collection Protocol bill in the Judiciary Committee

Presenting the Sexual Assault Kit Collection Protocol bill in the Judiciary Committee

Legislation Helps Provide Justice for Rape Victims

Legislation which aims to provide justice for victims of rape has been approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee. Senate Bill 981, sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), sets up procedures for the collection and storage of rape kits and requires law enforcement agencies to submit kits to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) for testing within 60 days. It also directs the Domestic Violence State Coordinating Council to develop a model policy for law enforcement agencies for responding to reports of sexual assault and requires law enforcement agencies to adopt a written policy on responding to reports of sexual assaults.

Norris led the effort to require all local law enforcement agencies to inventory back-logged rape kits across the state. Last September, the TBI reported 9,062 kits remained untested statewide. In 2013, Memphis reported an initial backlog of 12,000 kits which has now been reduced by over 5,000.

Norris said the bill approved by the committee also corresponds with legislation he sponsored last year which repealed the statute of limitations for rape, aggravated rape, rape of a child and aggravated rape of a child, as long as law enforcement or the district attorney general has been notified within three years of the offense. “This bill puts those protections and provisions in place,” he said. “It deals with a situation where evidence is collected, but the victim chooses not to report the assault. It creates a category for a hold kit, so that evidence is taken, is properly maintained, and then will be kept for at least three years.”

Norris also noted that the proposed state budget includes funding for three new forensic scientists at the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) to process forensic evidence in the kits at no charge to local law enforcement. “These funds will expedite the processing of rape kits and other DNA testing by providing additional essential personnel. They will be trained in accessing and updating the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) which is part of the FBI’s network for tracking perpetrators of crime — a critical weapon in the fight against crime.”

Approximately 90,000 women are raped every year in the United States with only 25 percent of these attacks resulting in arrests.

Legislation Calls for Tougher Penalties Against Those Convicted of Vehicular Homicide While Intoxicated

Those convicted of vehicular homicide while intoxicated would not be eligible for probation under legislation sponsored by Senator Doug Overbey (R-Maryville) and approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee this week. The bill comes after an investigative report in the Memphis Commercial Appeal showed Tennessee, which has among the nation’s toughest drunken driving laws for first offenders, is among the most lenient for DUI-related vehicular homicide due to a loophole in state law.

“This needs to be fixed immediately,” said Senator Overbey. “Those who drink, drive and kill must face tough punishment for the severity of their crime.”

Currently, a criminal defendant is eligible for probation if the sentence actually imposed is 10 years or less. Senate Bill 35 prohibits anyone convicted of or who pleads guilty to vehicular homicide by intoxication from being eligible for probation.

In 2012, the latest numbers available, 295 people died on Tennessee roadways in alcohol-related accidents, 29 percent of the traffic fatalities in the state that year.

The bill now goes to the Senate Finance Committee for consideration of the proposal’s financial impact.

The Mullins family came to visit this week for Spring Break

The Mullins family came to visit this week for Spring Break

Bill Promoting Civics Education Advances in Senate Education Committee

Legislation which would promote civics education in Tennessee advanced through the Senate Education Committee on Wednesday. Senate Bill 10, sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), would make components of the test administered by the United State Citizenship and Immigration Services to those seeking citizenship one of the tools used in assessing student progress under Tennessee’s civics education program.

Norris said the bill embraces legislation passed by the General Assembly in 2012 which restored the teaching of project-based civics and required the assessment of student progress between grades 4 and 8 and between grades 8 and 12.

The legislation approved by the Education Committee calls on local education agencies to utilize 25 to 50 of the 100 questions posed by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in the citizenship test. The test, which would be administered during high school, may be taken by the student multiple times until he or she scores at least 70 percent as required for graduation. Students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) would be exempt from the requirement under certain circumstances as provided by the bill. Students will continue to receive the project-based civics assessments provided under the 2012 law.

The bill provides that schools where seniors have all made a passing grade on the civics test be recognized on the Department of Education’s website as a U.S. Civics All-Star School.

“We cannot long survive as a viable republic if our students do not know how to be active and informed participants in our democracy,” said Senator Norris. “This is a very important initiative and dovetails with our previous efforts to provide essential civics education to our students.”

Leadership Tipton County (left) and Leadership Millington (right)

Leadership Tipton County (left) and Leadership Millington (right)

In Brief

Tennessee Choice and Opportunity Scholarships — State Senators voted this week to approve the “Tennessee Choice and Opportunity Scholarship Act.” Senate Bill 999, sponsored by Senator Todd Gardenhire (R-Chattanooga), would authorize state payments to follow the child to public or private schools for up to 5,000 students in its first year of operation. The program, which gives low-income parents a choice regarding the school that their child attends, would expand each year to a maximum of 20,000 statewide in the fourth year. Participating students would also have to be from families qualified to receive free or reduced price lunch under federal standards and from a school district with at least one failing school ranked in the bottom five percent of schools statewide. If caps are not reached each year, scholarships would be offered to other low-income children in those counties in which a school in the bottom five percent of schools is located. Currently, five counties meet that standard, including Davidson, Hamilton, Madison, Knox and Shelby.

Lifetime Handgun Carry Permits — The Senate Judiciary Committee approved legislation this week that creates a lifetime handgun carry permit. Senate Bill 700, sponsored by Senator Frank Niceley (R-Strawberry Plains), continues the present permit process, but gives citizens the option to pay a $750 fee for a permit to carry any handgun that the holder legally owns or possesses without expiration. Like the regular handgun carry permit, the lifetime permit would apply unless the holder no longer satisfies the requirements as set by Tennessee law. Background checks for lifetime permit holders would be conducted every five years under the bill.

Foster Children / Driver’s License — Children in foster care would find it easier to receive their driver’s license under legislation approved by the Senate this week. Senate Bill 1271, sponsored by Senator Ken Yager (R-Kingston), would authorize a foster parent or an authorized representative of the Department of Children’s Services (DCS) to sign an application for a driver’s license or an instructional permit for an individual under the age of 18. Current law allows parents, step-parents or guardians to sign for their minor child, but foster parents or DCS representative may not do that. “The bill removes that barrier and creates an equity for foster children who are seeking to obtain their driver’s license,” said Yager.

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Read Across America Day with Mrs. Donahue's class at Crosswind Elementary, Collierville

Read Across America Day with Mrs. Donahue’s class at Crosswind Elementary, Collierville

 

Tennessee Chamber of Commerce and Industry and Farm Bureau endorse Regulation Freedom Amendment

For Immediate Release
March 13, 2015
Contact: Darlene Schlicher (615) 741-6336 or email
[email protected]

NASHVILLE — A resolution sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville) that aims to force Congress to pass a “Regulation Freedom” Amendment to the U.S. Constitution has gained key endorsements from the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce and Farm Bureau.

In a letter to members of the State Senate, Chamber Vice President of Government Affairs, Bradley Jackson, urged lawmakers to support the measure saying increased government regulations have deterred economic growth and job creation. The Farm Bureau adopted a resolution in support of the measure at a meeting of the national organization in January.

Norris is scheduled to present the resolution for final consideration by the Senate on Monday.

“The business community in Tennessee has seen a marked increase in the number of rules and regulations promulgated by departments and agencies in the federal government,” said Jackson. “Oftentimes these rules and regulations are substantial in measure and go well beyond the scope of the initial legislation enacted by the United States Congress that created the measure. This increased government regulation has deterred economic growth and job creation and are often directly tied to increasing cost of everything from everyday consumer goods to the gas we put in our vehicles. Furthermore, Chamber members believe that substantial regulations constitute a ‘hidden tax’ that are instituted without a thorough review by Congress.”

Senate Joint Resolution 2 calls upon Congress to require that, whenever one quarter of the members of the U.S. House or the U.S. Senate transmit to the President their written declaration of opposition to a proposed federal regulation; a majority vote of the House and Senate is necessary to adopt it. Norris said that state legislators in two-thirds of the states could force Congress to propose the amendment just as states compelled Congress to propose the original Bill of Rights as they would do almost anything to avoid a convention that would be more powerful. He said two-thirds of the states working together would also have the power to safely limit their delegates to an up-or-down vote on just the amendment states wanted.

“I am very pleased that the Chamber has endorsed this Amendment,” said Norris. “Out of control federal regulations are burdening small businesses and job creators. We need to restore transparency and accountability in Washington by requiring congressional approval for new rules and regulations from federal agencies and this resolution is step one toward that goal.”

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Visitors to the Capitol during a busy week of March 2.

Visitors to the Capitol during a busy week of March 2.

NORRIS IDENTIFIES STATE FUNDING FOR RAPE KITS AND DNA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 12, 2015
CONTACT: Darlene Schlicher (615) 741-6336

NASHVILLE — Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville) recognized the Haslam Administration for funding three new forensic scientists at the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) in next year’s budget. The TBI processes forensic evidence at no charge to local law enforcement.

“These funds will expedite the processing of rape kits and other DNA testing by providing additional essential personnel. They will be trained in accessing and updating the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) which is part of the FBI’s network for tracking perpetrators of crime — a critical weapon in the fight against crime,” said Norris, who sponsors the budget in the Senate.

Norris enacted the law repealing the Tennessee statute of limitations in rape cases last year. He also led the effort to require all local law enforcement agencies to inventory back-logged inventories of rape kits across the state. Last September, the TBI reported 9,062 kits remained untested statewide.

“Progress is being made getting the old evidence tested, but this will help facilitate more timely testing of all DNA evidence,” said Norris.

The TBI has not received funding for new personnel for many years, even though the demand for more resources has increased dramatically.

According to City of Memphis officials, an initial backlog of 12,000 kits has now been reduced by nearly 5,000 kits since 2013 and has resulted in some 170 new investigations and 52 indictments including 19 rapists.

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Three West Tennessee workforce development collaboratives receive major LEAP grants

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Three West Tennessee workforce development collaboratives are among 12 recipients statewide which were chosen to receive a major grant under the state’s new Labor Education Alignment Program (LEAP). The grants include $743,500 to the Greater Memphis Alliance for a Competitive Workforce in conjunction with Southwest Tennessee Community College; $850,000 to the Northwest Tennessee Workforce Board in conjunction with Dyersburg State Community College and $900,000 to Jackson Regional Partnership in conjunction with Jackson State Community College.

 

The project affects students at the colleges’ campuses in the Greater Memphis area, Dyersburg, Covington, Jackson, Newbern, Ripley, Lexington, Crump, McKenzie, Paris, Whiteville and Brownsville.   “This is a tremendous opportunity for West Tennessee to provide a skilled workforce and opportunities for Tennesseans to work, earn and learn,” said Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), who sponsored legislation creating the LEAP program in the Tennessee General Assembly. “These grants mean business, and the State of Tennessee supports and appreciates these initiatives.”

 

The LEAP program enables students in Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology and community colleges to participate in technical training developed with input from area employers. Norris said the grants enable collaborative efforts by business, government and institutions of higher learning to facilitate job training and relevant education, while giving state and local economic development leaders a boost as they recruit new industry.   The cooperative training counts as part of an approved curriculum toward a meaningful certificate or degree.

Twelve LEAP grant recipients were chosen from applicants across the state by a committee consisting of representatives from higher education, the Department of Economic and Community Development and the Department of Labor. The grant program was funded by a $10 million appropriation in the 2014-15 state budget also sponsored by Norris. “Employers demand candidates with the skills needed in today’s technologically-advanced workplace,” Norris added. “These grants help fill the skills gaps in the local workforce pool, while increasing the number of Tennesseans with post-secondary degrees.”

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