Bredesen’s budget boo-boo

On November 23, 2009, in News 2009, by Mark Norris

Commercial Appeal, Letters to the Editor November 23, 2009 Five months after the 106th Tennessee General Assembly adjourned its first session, Gov. Phil Bredesen is stumping the state for support of his budget for next year, trying to keep us from focusing on his one that is crashing around him. It is a $1.5 billion […]

Commercial Appeal, Letters to the Editor
November 23, 2009

Five months after the 106th Tennessee General Assembly adjourned its first session, Gov. Phil Bredesen is stumping the state for support of his budget for next year, trying to keep us from focusing on his one that is crashing around him.

It is a $1.5 billion boo-boo that will cost Tennessee taxpayers in terms of limited services and quite possibly a tax increase. The governor made very optimistic income projections when he created the current budget and failed to make some recommended cuts in certain departments, which is costing us even more.

This is far too serious for him to be tossing darts at those who disagree with some of his budget proposals. He is still lobbing insults at Sen. Mark Norris, R-Collierville, for questioning last year’s short-sighted budget (Nov. 17 article, “Bredesen fires back at Norris op-ed/Calls column on budget plans ‘nonsense’ “).

Norris is Senate majority leader, which puts him in position to challenge any legislation brought forth by the opposite party. Bredesen has called Norris’ input “nonsense” and “stupid,” which leads me to believe he is not very secure in his own proposals.

He would be wise to listen to recommendations from Norris and any other representative of the General Assembly. They are the most knowledgeable about our financial situation. They are closest to the people of Tennessee — who, by the way, are the ones who generate the money to fund the budgets.

This is Bredesen’s last year in office. He wants to leave his legacy by funding his pet projects with our money — money that will not come to the state until he is long gone. And he wants to string out his budget goofs and let the next governor — in all likelihood a Republican — clean up his mess.

Cherrie Holden

Germantown